Equal pay debate and the equal pay act of 1963

Libertas

Administrator
Staff member
Listen to just about anyone running for president, Hillary for example, and they may say, "When I am president women will make just as much as men." As of yet I have not heard anyone challenge the use of the buzzwords.

Just about every state, and the federal government has laws on the books saying pay discrimination is illegal. Yet, politicians keep repeating the say phrases over and over.

What is the government going to do, pass more laws on top of laws?
 

IamZeke

Member
Equal pay for equal work. It's that simple. It doesn't mean that equal jobs means equal pay though. If a woman needs more down time to take care of personal or family needs then she's getting less work done and doesn't rate the same pay as a man in the same job who gets more production done. For that matter, it goes for others too. As a single guy with no family at home I put in more hours and get more done than a lot of my married male coworkers. I'm freer to travel and spend a lot of time out of town. I've had this argument with bosses before. They either pay me more or I'm taking more leisure time for myself. Typically the bosses think they can just tell me to go home earlier because they don't want to hear the other project engineers squawk that I get paid more. But eventually they find their nuts in a vice on a job and call me in as cavalry. I make sure they understand what comes next.

Equal pay for equal production. I'm all for it. But don't expect me to suffer so that peers get to play personal or family games at my expense.
 

Libertas

Administrator
Staff member
Equal pay for equal work. It's that simple. It doesn't mean that equal jobs means equal pay though.

Typically, not always, women work less hours than men, which affects their end of year average pay.

Women also are more willing to work for lower wages than men. This is why companies such as walmart hire a lot of women. While men are more willing to ask for a raise, women are less likely to unionize and directly confront their supervisor about their wages.
 

IamZeke

Member
Typically, not always, women work less hours than men, which affects their end of year average pay.
Which works out more fair if the job pays an hourly rate. But with salary you get into the problems. If they expect to be allowed to hover closer to home and solve family problems then they are of less value than someone less unencumbered and puts in more productivity time when it is valued most. It's why flex time is seen as a pay benefit. Working the hours you like better aren't as valuable as the hours the employer needs the most done.

When, where, and how well you work count beyond simply working. All these equality rights open doors to destroy the value of those willing to work anywhere, anytime, as hard/skilled/long as needed.

Women also are more willing to work for lower wages than men. This is why companies such as walmart hire a lot of women. While men are more willing to ask for a raise, women are less likely to unionize and directly confront their supervisor about their wages.
Most men are more willing to risk job loss than women will. Good bosses should recognize that. But publicly traded corporate retail USA is not a good boss. They are too focused on short term gain because they are have enslaved themselves to quarterly earnings reports.

But then publicly traded companies come with a lot of inherent flaws that are harsh on society. Privately held corporations get the luxury of long term vision. Without any nods to the commies, a good capitalist should recognize the way we create no-liability publicly companies has flaws. This goes back to the extortion by the Yankee industrialists after the Civil War over the nation's war debt that was held privately. When the railroads and the Interstate Commerce Act was passed the private bond holders made Congress allow no-liability public corporations as the defacto interest on the war debt. Everyone thinks if we could back up time to the creation of the Fed that we could clean up corporatism. Not so. The last time that this country was sound in both government and private business dates back to Jackson's presidency.
 
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